What was the Senate vote for the 19th Amendment?

Congress Approves Nineteenth Amendment. On June 4, 1919, Congress, by joint resolution, approved the woman’s suffrage amendment and sent it to the states for ratification. The House of Representatives had voted 304-89 and the Senate 56-25 in favor of the amendment.

Who was the deciding vote for the 19th Amendment?

The state senate voted to ratify, but in the state house of representatives, the vote resulted in a tie. A young man named Harry Burn cast the tie-breaking vote. Acting on advice from his mother Phoebe, Burn voted to ratify the amendment. On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment.

What was the vote on women’s suffrage?

The Senate fails to approve the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, falling one vote short of the necessary two-thirds present and voting, with a vote of 55-29. After 41 years of debate, the Senate finally approves a constitutional amendment to provide for woman suffrage, 56-25.

Which political party supported the 19th Amendment?

It was a decisive victory, and the split among Democrats and Republicans was staggering. In all, over 200 Republicans voted in favor of the 19th Amendment, while only 102 Democrats voted alongside them. Subsequently, on June 4, 1919, the 19th Amendment passed the Senate by a vote of 56 to 25.

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Why did Harry T Burn changed his vote?

He responded to attacks on his integrity and honor by inserting a personal statement into the House Journal, explaining his decision to cast the vote in part because “I knew that a mother’s advice is always safest for a boy to follow, and my mother wanted me to vote for ratification.”

Who voted for 15th amendment?

The House of Representatives passed the amendment, with 143 Republicans and one Conservative Republican voting “Yea” and 39 Democrats, three Republicans, one Independent Republican and one Conservative voting “No”; 26 Republicans, eight Democrats, and one Independent Republican did not vote.

How long has the battle for women’s suffrage or the right to vote been waged?

The women’s suffrage movement was a decades-long fight to win the right to vote for women in the United States. It took activists and reformers nearly 100 years to win that right, and the campaign was not easy: Disagreements over strategy threatened to cripple the movement more than once.

When was direct election of senators?

Passed by Congress May 13, 1912, and ratified April 8, 1913, the 17th amendment modified Article I, section 3, of the Constitution by allowing voters to cast direct votes for U.S. Senators. Prior to its passage, Senators were chosen by state legislatures.

Who fought for women’s voting rights?

The leaders of this campaign—women like Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone and Ida B. Wells—did not always agree with one another, but each was committed to the enfranchisement of all American women.

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Why did Woodrow Wilson pass the 19th Amendment?

Some of the jailed suffragists went on a hunger strike and were force-fed by their captors. Wilson, appalled by the hunger strikes and worried about negative publicity for his administration, finally agreed to a suffrage amendment in January 1918.

How did the parties vote on the 19th Amendment?

On May 21, 1919, the amendment passed the House 304 to 89, with 42 votes more than was necessary. On June 4, 1919, it was brought before the Senate and, after Southern Democrats abandoned a filibuster, 36 Republican Senators were joined by 20 Democrats to pass the amendment with 56 yeas, 25 nays, and 14 not voting.

What was the suffragists response to the 19th Amendment?

After the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, suffragists like Alice Paul knew that their work wasn’t finished. While the government recognized women’s right to vote, many women still faced discrimination. Paul and other members of the National Woman’s Party drafted the Equal Rights Amendment.