Question: What did the women’s suffrage movement want?

The women’s suffrage movement was a decades-long fight to win the right to vote for women in the United States. It took activists and reformers nearly 100 years to win that right, and the campaign was not easy: Disagreements over strategy threatened to cripple the movement more than once.

What were the goals of the women’s suffrage movement?

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association. The primary goal of the organization is to achieve voting rights for women by means of a Congressional amendment to the Constitution.

What did women’s rights activists want?

Voting wasn’t their only goal, or even their main one. Voting wasn’t their only goal, or even their main one. … They battled racism, economic oppression and sexual violence—along with the law that made married women little more than property of their husbands.

What were the main arguments for and against women’s suffrage?

Women voters, they said, would bring their moral superiority and domestic expertise to issues of public concern. Anti-suffragists argued that the vote directly threatened domestic life. They believed that women could more effectively promote change outside of the corrupt voting booth.

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What did the women’s rights movement accomplish?

The women’s movement was most successful in pushing for gender equality in workplaces and universities. The passage of Title IX in 1972 forbade sex discrimination in any educational program that received federal financial assistance. The amendment had a dramatic affect on leveling the playing field in girl’s athletics.

How did World War 1 contribute to women’s suffrage movement?

The entry of the United States into the fighting in Europe momentarily slowed the longstanding national campaign to win women’s right to vote. … Their activities in support of the war helped convince many Americans, including President Woodrow Wilson, that all of the country’s female citizens deserved the right to vote.

What were the goals of the women’s liberation movement in the 1960s?

The women’s rights movement of the 1960s and ’70s was a social movement with the main goal of women’s freedom (for this reason, it was also called the women’s liberation movement) and equality. It upset long-established social norms and brought about groundbreaking changes in the American political and legal systems.

What was a major goal of the early women’s rights activists in the mid 1800s?

In the early years of the women’s rights movement, the agenda included much more than just the right to vote. Their broad goals included equal access to education and employment, equality within marriage, and a married woman’s right to her own property and wages, custody over her children and control over her own body.

Why was women’s suffrage so important?

The woman’s suffrage movement is important because it resulted in passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which finally allowed women the right to vote.

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What strategy did suffragists take to get the right to vote?

Traditional lobbying and petitioning were a mainstay of NWP members, but these activities were supplemented by other more public actions–including parades, pageants, street speaking, and demonstrations. The party eventually realized that it needed to escalate its pressure and adopt even more aggressive tactics.

Why did men oppose the women’s suffrage movement?

The men and women who opposed woman’s suffrage did so for many reasons. Many believed that men and women were fundamentally different and that women should not sully themselves in the dirty world of politics. … Others also acted out of self-interest when working against woman’s suffrage.

What was one achievement in the fight for women’s rights?

Although some of their goals, such as achieving property rights for married women, were reached early on, their biggest goal—winning the right to vote—required the 1920 passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.